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February 13th, 2010
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Roswell Honors Boy Scouts of America


Mayor Jere Wood set aside February 8 as the city's honorary Boy Scouts of America Day for Roswell.

Special recognition was given to Brandon Padget by Fire Chief Ricky Spencer for using the life-saving skills he learned in Boy Scouts.

By Helen Borland / Staff


Mayor Jere Wood set aside February 8 as the city's honorary Boy Scouts of America Day for Roswell.


Dozens of Boy Scouts that were heralded at Monday's city council meeting, and Wood read a compelling proclamation honoring their lofty achievements.


One Boy Scout in particular was singled out for a heroic act. Brandon Padget, 16, with troop 629, was home with his parents in Dec. 2008, when his mother, who had been having trouble breathing, passed out. Brandon quickly assessed the situation and calmly performed CPR on his mother while his father called 911. Ricky Spencer, Roswell's Fire Chief, presented Padget with an "official" fire department cap for his quick thinking in an emergency situation. Boy Scouts are taught resuscitation measures such as CPR and the Heimlich maneuver, and Spencer said that training definitely paid off for the Padget family.


Brandon's father, H.N. Padget, achieved the highest advancement rank, Eagle, and has encouraged Brandon to be active in scouts. To earn this rank a youth must earn 21 merit badges, including Emergency Preparedness or Lifesaving.


Wood at the troop's January Court of Honor presented Brandon Padget a medal.  As a youth, Wood earned his Eagle Scout award from Troop 87, one of the oldest and longest serving troops in Roswell.


THE PRICE IS RIGHT


Councilwoman Betty Price encouraged Padget and all the other scouts to earn their Eagle Scout award. Price was wearing the pin a mother receives when her son attains the rank of Eagle, an achievement only about five percent of Scouts accomplish. Price encouraged the boys. "Make your mothers happy and go the distance," she said.


One of the Scout leaders in attendance was Bill Leach, a volunteer Unit Commissioner for the Chattahoochee District who's been involved in Scouting for almost 30 years. According to Leach, there are almost 1,400 youths involved in the Chattahoochee District (Sandy Springs and Roswell). The boys are divided into age groups. There are Cub Scout packs (ages 7-10), Boy Scout troops (11- 17), varsity team (14-17), and venturing crews and sea scouts (coeducational 14-20) that are sponsored by schools, churches and community groups. 


There are 20,000 active scouts in the 13-county Atlanta Area Council. This year the Chattahoochee District was one of only eight in the Council that earned a Quality District Award. In order to qualify, 60 percent of the units must have trained leaders, growth and recruitment of new members, and youths advancing in their ranks.


The BSA is celebrating its 100th anniversary this month, and to honor its 100 years, they are planning a year-long celebration in Roswell that includes planting 100 trees donated by Home Depot. In May the Campout of the Century will be held at Bert Adams Scout Reservation (the 50th anniversary of that scout camp) in Covington, GA. They are expecting 5,000 scouts to come and enjoy many fun activities and an amazing arena show. In October the Scout Fest, involving hundreds of units, will be held at the Cobb Galleria. This is an exhibition of indoor and outdoor Scouting skills open to the public.

Special recognition was given to Brandon Padget by Fire Chief Ricky Spencer for using the life-saving skills he learned in Boy Scouts. Pictured L to R are Fire Chief Ricky Spencer, Council Members Betty Price, Becky Wynn and Jerry Orlans, Brandon's father  H.N. Padget, Brandon Padget, Mayor Jere Wood, Council Members Nancy Diamond and Rich Dippolito.


The Boy Scouts of America is one of the nation's largest and most prominent values-based youth development organizations. The BSA provides a program for young people that builds character, trains them in the responsibilities of participating citizenship, and develops personal fitness.


For 100 years, the BSA has helped build future leaders of this country by combining educational activities and lifelong values with fun. The Boy Scouts of America believes that helping youth is a key to building a more conscientious, responsible, and productive society.


Email Helen Borland at hborland@beaconcast.com.

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